June 11, 2024

How to Prepare Argentine Asado in the Oven

if you want to cook Argentine Asado in the oven and want it to taste absolutely incredible, keep on reading for very straightforward and simple techniques. These will allow you to cook Argentine meat in the oven and leave your guests (and yourself!) impressed by the quality and the flavor of this “asado”. Let’s go!  […]

Daniela Solis

June 11, 2024

if you want to cook Argentine Asado in the oven and want it to taste absolutely incredible, keep on reading for very straightforward and simple techniques. These will allow you to cook Argentine meat in the oven and leave your guests (and yourself!) impressed by the quality and the flavor of this “asado”. Let’s go! 

Make Sure Meat is at Room Temperature

The first crucial step in making sure your meat tastes incredible is ensuring it’s at room temperature. Rest it for at least 2 hours outside of the fridge before you put it in the oven. Preheat the oven just a few minutes before you’re ready to cook.

Prepare Your Meat

Once your meat is ready and you’ve cut away any excess membrane or fat, brush a thin layer of olive oil over the entire surface. This will help the meat absorb your salt and pepper plus all the flavors once it goes into the oven.

Prepare Your Tin Tray

We’re going to be cooking this asado in a simple tin tray. Line the tray with foil. Why? Because the meat will be in the oven for 2 and a half hours, and by the time it’s done, all the residue will stick to your tin base if you haven’t lined it with foil.

Season the Meat

Now that we’ve applied the olive oil and have our tin tray ready, the next step is to season the meat. I typically use coarse marine salt mixed with a few spices, but you can use regular salt. If you like, add some pepper as well. 

Apply a thin layer of salt on both sides of the flank. It’s very important to do this after applying the oil because the oil helps the salt and spices adhere better to the meat, ensuring an even distribution of flavor. Plus, the oil forms a barrier that locks in the meat’s natural juices, enhancing both taste and texture during cooking.

Create Humidity – But Don’t Let it Boil!

When you put the meat in the dish that’s going to go in the oven, you have to create humidity without boiling the meat. So, I usually prepare about a liter and a half of stock with fresh rosemary, standard meat stock, sweet pepper, chili, black pepper, and salt. Let this mixture rest for about half an hour.

Wrap the Meat In Aluminium Foil

The next step for oven-cooking your Argentine Asado is to take your aluminum foil and cover the meat with foil. You’re basically creating a capsule so the humidity can’t escape, but remember, the humidity should not be in direct contact with the meat. This prevents the meat from boiling while keeping it moist.

Cooking the Meat

When putting the wrapped meat in the oven, set your alarm for around 2 hours and 30 minutes. You might be able to bring it out at 2 hours, but ideally, 2 hours and 30 minutes will make it incredibly tasty, tender, and extremely moist. The temperature I set my oven at is 170°C. You can adjust the time and heat, but in my experience, 170°C for around 2 hours and 15 to 2 hours and 30 minutes works perfectly.

Tips for Different Cuts of Meat

  • Ribeye: Ribeye cuts are thicker and marbled with fat, which means they can handle higher heat for a shorter period. For ribeye, try 180°C for about 1 hour and 45 minutes to 2 hours. The fat will render beautifully, keeping the meat juicy.
  • Flank: Flank steak is leaner and benefits from longer, slower cooking to break down the fibers. Stick to the 170°C for 2 hours and 30 minutes as outlined above.
  • Short Ribs: To become tender, ribs need low and slow cooking. Set your oven to 160°C and cook for 3 to 3.5 hours. The meat will be fall-off-the-bone tender.
  • Pork: This cut can also benefit from a low and slow approach. Cook at 150°C for 3 to 4 hours. The lower temperature and longer time ensure the fat renders properly, making the meat incredibly tender.

Taking the Meat Out of the Oven

Once the cooking time is up, take off the aluminum foil and let the meat rest for about 5 to 10 minutes. This resting period ensures the meat is extremely tender and filled with juice. You’ll see the juices running through the fibers, and when you cut directly against the grain, the meat will just fall apart. 

Ready to start preparing your Argentine Asado in the oven? As you can see, it has nothing to envy with meat grilled in your parrilla. Just pick your favorite meat cut, invite friends over, prepare the salads, and enjoy this oven-cooked Argentine asado that rivals any grilled version.

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How to prepare argentine asado in the oven
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How to prepare argentine asado in the oven
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if you want to cook Argentine Asado in the oven and want it to taste absolutely incredible, keep on reading for very straightforward and simple techniques.
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Argentine Asado

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